Some of the greatest players of all-time in Major League Baseball history received their glory due to their ability to field their position with excellence.  Brooks Robinson comes to mind among many that developed an outstanding reputation for his glove more than his bat.  He was a master at his craft.

Baltimore Orioles Brooks Robinson

Some would argue fielding in baseball is as important as hitting, if not more so.  Regardless of your position in that debate, it is safe to say that fielding is crucial in any Major League Baseball game.  It’s just as important when playing Baseball Classics next generation baseball board game as well.  That is why we offer two fielding options to play Baseball Classics; one is with our straight-forward Team Fielding & Error Chart and another is with our Individual Fielding Grid for those who want to see where the ball is put into play and if it was handled with or without an error by that player.

This article will cover fielding using the Team Baseball Classics Fielding & Error Chart and a subsequent post will explore the usage of the Individual Baseball Classics Fielding Grid.

In Baseball Classics baseball game Intermediate play level you determine just how valuable fielding is to you when creating your lineup.  This adds another level strategic thinking to your play.  Each player card has one or more Fielding ratings.  All ratings are based on their actual MLB season performance.

Keeping with the consistent easy to play full color theme, the ratings are color-coded symbols.  There are four rating levels as follows:

 Excellent rating      Very good rating      Fair rating      Poor rating

Players fielding ratings are in the upper right hand side located just to the right of their name.

Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart

The Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart has the same look and feel format of our colorful next generation player cards and uses the same lookup when looking up the results of your play actions.  There are 5 columns including the Roll and one for each red, yellow, blue, and red symbol rating.  To the right of the Fielding & Error charts there is a Legend for each.  Note the colors and symbols used to indicate whether a fielding play has been made with or without an error.

Baseball Classics Team Fielding Chart

Team Fielding Play

The Fielding & Error charts in the Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart is your reference point whenever the ball is put into play.  This includes any of the following fielding plays:

  • Groundout
  • Popout
  • Lineout
  • Flyout
  • Double Play
  • Triple Play
  • Single
  • Double
  • Triple
  • Bunt
  • Steal
  • Base Running

Immediately after any of these play results occur, the team on defense rolls all 3 six-sided dice to determine if that play was fielded cleanly or an error occurred by referencing the Fielding chart based on the team’s collective fielding rating.  If there is no error on the play, then continue with the next play or at bat.  However, if an error has occurred, the team on defense rolls again to determine if the error is a 1-base, 2-base, or 3-base error.

In Team Fielding Play, individual fielding ratings of every position player are very important. Each fielders rating symbol are weighted using the following values:

(1) (2) (3) (4)

Add up the values by position to determine the Team’s Fielding Rating. For example, the position players have the following ratings:

Pitcher

Catcher

First baseman

Second baseman

Third baseman

Shortstop

Leftfield

Centerfield

Rightfield

Based on these ratings this Team’s Fielding Rating is 20. (3+1+2+1+2+4+2+3+2 = 20) A 20 is a Blue rating (see the Fielding Chart Legend in the Baseball Classics Game Play Chart).

After each fielding play roll all 3 six-sided dice and look up the outcome based on the Team’s Fielding rating color in the Fielding Chart. If the dice roll equals the color square in that column, an error has occurred.

If an error has occurred, roll all 3 six-sided dice again and refer to the Error Chart to see what type of base error the team has committed. Note if the play was an “Infield Play” or and “Outfield Play” to see if it’s a 1 base, 2 base, or 3 base error.  When a batter reaches base due to an error, the team on offense may attempt to send any base runners an extra base just like they would if it was a hit.

Remember to re-calculate the team’s fielding rating anytime you make a position player substitution during the game.

Play Example 1 – Flyout, no error on the play

No runners on base, the team on defense has a collective rating of 12 points (Green Team Fielding rating).  The Result is a Flyout.

Roll all 3 six-sided dice to see if the play was fielded without an error, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 14 (6, 6, 2)

Referencing the Fielding chart, under the Roll column to 14, then looking under the Green rating column, a roll of 14 is a white filled square.  The Fielding chart Legend indicates “No error on play”.

 

Play Example 2 – Double Play, no error on the play

Runner on 1st Base, the team on defense has a collective rating of 15 points (Yellow Team Fielding rating).  The Result is a Double Play.

Roll all 3 six-sided dice to see if the play was fielded without an error, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 11 (4, 2, 5)

Referencing the Fielding chart, under the Roll column to 11, then looking under the Yellow rating column, a roll of 11 is a white filled square.  The Fielding chart Legend indicates “No error on play”.  That first out was fielded cleanly and is applied towards the base runner who was heading to 2nd Base.

Next, roll all 3 six-sided dice again to see if the second out in the Double Play was fielded cleanly.  Standard six-sided dice total 16 (5, 6, 5)  A reference of the Fielding chart and lookup based on the Yellow column indicates the second out has been recorded successfully.

 

Play Example 3  – Single plus error on the play

Runner on 2nd Base, the team on defense has a collective rating of 27 points (Red Team Fielding rating).  The Result is a Single, putting runners on 1st and 3rd Base.

Roll all 3 six-sided dice to see if the play was fielded without an error, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 16 (4, 6, 6)

Referencing the Fielding chart, under the Roll column to 16, then looking under the Red rating column, a roll of 16 is a red filled square.  The Fielding chart Legend indicates “Error for fielding rating 25 points & up, else no error on play”.

Next, roll all 3 six-sided dice again to see what type of error occurred when the team on defense fielded the Single.  Standard six-sided dice total 7 (1, 3, 3), a reference of the Error chart and lookup based on the Red column indicates “1 Base Error” has occurred on the play, thus moving both base runners 1 extra base.  The runner on 3rd Base scores and the runner on 1st Base advances to 2nd Base.

 

In this article on Team Fielding in the Baseball Classics baseball game Intermediate play level, we covered how important it is to consider the impact of fielding when building your lineup through the easy color-coded, symbolic rating system.  After adding up the total of the team’s defensive point rating, that rating is used to determine if a infield or outfield play was fielded cleanly by referencing the Baseball Classics Fielding and Error charts.  It’s remarkable how one player in your lineup can make or break the defense rating to the next level up or down.  Team Fielding adds a very exciting element to every play all the way to the last out.  It’s easy and fast to use in Baseball Classics.  However if you want to get down to the individual player level, stay tuned for our next article.

The next article, will be our 6th in this series of How To Play Baseball Classics as we focus on the Advanced play level.  I will delve into the 2nd fielding option we offer in Baseball Classics; individual fielding through the use of the Baseball Classics color-coded Fielding Grid.

We always appreciate hearing from our readers, please share your questions, comments, and thoughts on playing Baseball Classics with fielding.