With threatening skies to rain out the rest of the game in the bottom of the 6th with the tying run on 2nd base, two outs, and your best pitcher coming up should you pinch hit?  Should you make a defensive replacement at Catcher who is your best hitter, but not so good behind the plate to prevent a passed ball from your flaming throwing stopper coming in with the tying run on 3rd base in the bottom of the 9th and 1 out?

baseball game threatnening skiesThese are many other decisions are all in play when using the Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator.  The purpose is to challenge your management skills requiring important decisions; especially at critical times during your game play.  It’s simulator actions require your reaction or ignite your proactive decision making throughout a game from the first at bat to the last.

Virtually anything can happen when using the Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator.  It is designed to seamlessly flow along with your game play as well as feels like you’re playing against another big league Manager countering your every move.  Thus serves a dual purpose as adding virtually anything that can happen in a Major League Baseball Game while acting as the opposing Manager to the team at bat.

It’s easy to use, let’s take a look.

Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator

How to play using the Play Action Simulator Chart

Before any at bat, the team at bat will announce their play (i.e. steal, bunt, batter  swings away, etc.).

1.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice.

2.  Refer to applicable column on the Play Action Simulator Chart.

3.  If the outcome is “Batter swings away”, roll all dice and refer to the batter or pitcher’s card for the respective play result OR if the outcome is any other play, follow the instruction of that play, then repeat these steps until the result is Batter swings away”

Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator columns

The first column is for the dice roll of the six-sided dice and the next 5 columns depend upon whether there are no runners on base or have at least one base runner.

When there is 1 base runner, reference his Steal rating to cross-reference with the dice roll to determine the play from the Play Action Simulator.  When there are 2 or more runners on base, then reference the Steal rating of the base runner that the team on defense wants to hold closest to the base.

The body of the Play Action Simulator contains virtually anything that can happen in a Major League Baseball game as listed and defined in it’s Legend.  Here are how each play action works in Baseball Classics.

Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator Chart Definitions

Argument with the Umpire

After getting this outcome, roll the dice against the batter and pitcher cards to see what the result is.  If the result is one of the following, the argument with the umpire is with the player as follows:

Walk – Pitcher

All other results – Batter

Heated arguments with the umpire lead to an ejection when it’s the second time in the game that same player had an argument.

Balk

All runners advance 1 base.

Batter Hit by Pitch

Batter is awarded first base, the ball is dead.  Only runners in a force situation at first base, first and second base, or with the bases loaded will advance 1 base.  If a batter is hit right after a homerun, then both benches are warned and the next pitcher to hit a batter by pitch is ejected.  Or if a batter is hit by pitch and the following inning a batter from the other team is hit by pitch, both benches are warned and the next pitcher to hit a batter by pitch is ejected.

Batter Swings Away

When the result is Batter Swings Away, roll all 3 dice again and check the result against the batter or pitcher player card.

Catcher’s Interference

The batter is awarded first base and the play is over.  The only runners that may advance on the play 1 base, are those in a force situation at first base, first and second base, or with the bases loaded.

Dropped Third Strike

When the outcome is Dropped Third Strike, roll all 3 dice against the batter and pitcher cards.  If the result is “Strikeout” then the batter reaches first base safely and all runners advance 1 base.  However if the result was anything other than “Strikeout”, there is no dropped third strike and you will follow the Result from your roll against the batter or pitcher card.

Passed Ball

All runner(s) advance 1 base unless the catcher has a fielding rating of ▲.  If the catcher has that rating then there is no passed ball, instead the result is Batter swings away.

Pick Off Attempt

The pitcher is making an attempt to pick off the lead base runner.  Roll the 3 colored dice; if the result is a 0-0-0, 1-1-1, 2-2-2, 3-3-3, 4-4-4, 5-5-5, or 6-6-6 the runner is picked off.  After a pick off attempt, if using Team Fielding, roll the dice after and check the Error Chart to see if the play was fielded cleanly or an error was made.

Pitch Out

If a steal attempt or suicide squeeze has been called, the base runner attempting to advance must try stealing the base with a reduced rating by 1 triangle.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice and refer to the Steal Chart.  Note, if the runner has a ▼ Steal rating, he is automatically out.

Player Injury

Here’s how to determine which player sustained an injury.  After getting this outcome, roll the dice against the batter and pitcher cards to see what the result is.  When the result is one of the following, the injury is against the player as follows:

Strikeout – Pitcher

Walk – Pitcher

Lineout – Pitcher

All other results – Batter

Roll the 3 six-sided dice and refer to the Player Injury Chart in the Baseball Classics© Baseball Game Chart to determine the extent of the injury.

Note – If you choose to play without injuries, substitute an Injury result with Batter swings away instead.

Rain Delay

When playing in an outdoor stadium, roll all 3 dice before the game.  If a 1-16 is rolled then dark skies and threatening weather conditions exist.  The third time a rain delay occurs in a game, it’s rained out.

If a 1-16 was not rolled prior to the start of the game, then anytime RD is the outcome, instead it is Batter swings away.

Wild Pitch

All runner(s) advance 1 base.

 

Let’s walk through some play examples using the Play Action Simulator using these 3 player cards:  at the plate is 1975 Cincinnati Reds Pete Rose, he’s facing 1962 San Francisco Giants Juan Marichal pitching, and on deck is Cincinnati Reds Joe Morgan.

Baseball Classics Juan Marichal Pete Rose Joe Morgan

Play Example 1 – No runners on base, Single for Pete Rose

Top of the inning, no runners on base.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 9 (3, 3, 3).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 9 and cross-reference over to the next column (No runners on base) and see the result is “Batter swings away”.

Now roll all 4 dice (white binary and 3 six-sided dice), the roll is 1, 8 (2, 3, 3) a Single on Pete Rose’s card.

 

Play Example 2 – Runner on 1st Base, Wild Pitch

Pete Rose on 1st Base, the Red Sox catcher behind the plate has a yellow defensive rating.

With Pete Rose being the only runner on base, his Steal rating  will now be used in the column of the Play Action Simulator to determine the play with Joe Morgan coming up to the plate.  The team on offense elects to let Morgan swing away, so they roll the dice and check to see what happens in the Play Action Simulator.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 17 (5, 6, 6).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 17 and cross-reference over to the red column  and see the result is “WP” (Wild Pitch – green).  This is a wild pitch UNLESS the Boston Red Sox catcher has a green defensive fielding rating, if so the result would change to “Batter swings away” instead of Wild Pitch.  Since the Red Sox catcher has a yellow defensive fielding rating this is a Wild Pitch.

Since the result wasn’t Batter swings away, once again the team on offense makes their call.  With Rose on 2nd Base the call is again to let Morgan swing away.  Rolling the 3 six-sided dice this time they add up to an 11 (4, 4, 3).  Cross-referencing the 11 and the  column, the result is “Batter swings away”.

Now roll all 4 dice (white binary and 3 six-sided dice), the roll is 1, 12 (5, 2, 5) a Single on Joe Morgan’s card; that puts Rose on 3rd and Morgan on 1st Base.

 

Play Example 3 – Runners on 1st and 3rd Base, Pickoff Attempt and a Pitch Out

Runners on 1st and 3rd Base.

With the next batter up in the Reds lineup, they elect to let him swing away.

The team on defense has a decision to make for the Play Action Simulator, for they can choose either Rose on 3rd Base or Morgan on 1st Base to hold close.  Rose has a Steal rating of  thus he’s no threat to steal home, on the other hand Morgan has a Steal rating of  so he’s a big threat to steal 2nd Base.  Thus the team on defense chooses to make any play on him through the Play Action Simulator, meaning we will cross-reference the  column, not the  column for this next roll against the Play Action Simulator.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 14 (3, 5, 6).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 14 and cross-reference over to the red column  and see the result is “PA” (Pickoff attempt – red).

Here’s the definition of what to do with a Pickoff Attempt:

Pick Off Attempt

The pitcher is making an attempt to pick off the lead base runner.  Roll the 3 colored dice; if the result is a 0-0-0, 1-1-1, 2-2-2, 3-3-3, 4-4-4, 5-5-5, or 6-6-6 the runner is picked off.  After a pick off attempt, if using Team Fielding, roll the dice after and check the Error Chart to see if the play was fielded cleanly or an error was made.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice, the result is 2-1-5.  If using Team Fielding, roll the dice again to check whether or not the pickoff attempt was fielded cleanly.

Since the result wasn’t “Batter swings away” yet, the team on offense needs to declare what their intention is for the at bat again knowing the hold is still on Morgan.  With that hold they decide for Morgan to steal 2nd Base.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 9 (4, 2, 3).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 9 and cross-reference over to the   column and see the result is “PO” (Pitch out – red).

Here’s the definition of what to do with a Pitch Out:

Pitch Out

If a steal attempt or suicide squeeze has been called, the base runner attempting to advance must try stealing the base with a reduced rating by 1 triangle.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice and refer to the Steal Chart.  Note, if the runner has a   Steal rating, he is automatically out.

With a steal attempt called, Morgan’s Steal rating is reduced from a  to a   rating.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice, the result is an 8 (4, 1, 3) which is Runner thrown out in the  ► column.  Note the  column shows Morgan would have been safe, so the Pitch Out made a big difference in the outcome in the Play Action Simulator.

That leaves Rose on 3rd Base, the team on offense elects to let the current batter swing away.  Rolling the 3 six-sided dice this time they add up to an 13 (6, 5, 2).  Cross-referencing the 11 and the  column, the result is “Batter swings away”.

We demonstrated the impact of the Play Action Simulator in several game situations reflecting how virtually anything can happen in a Major League Baseball game.  It’s the combination of those plays as well as playing against another manager causing the team at bat to either be proactive or reactive.

This 7th How To Play Baseball Classics article concludes a close-up look at how to play from Basic to Intermediate to Advanced levels to further enhance your game play.  We look forward to any questions or comments you have for us.  Please share your experience playing Baseball Classics using any of the areas covered during our series such as bunting, base stealing, base running, team fielding, the Fielding Grid, and Play Action Simulator.