Baseball Classics All-Time Greats – Houston Colt .45s-Astros

Baseball Classics All-Time Greats – Houston Colt .45s-Astros

This Houston franchise was born in the year 1962 and belonged to the National League, in 2013 they are making the switch to the American League.  They began as the Colt .45s, though after a few years changed the team name to the Astros when they moved from Colt Stadium to the Houston Astrodome.  During the 1970’s they were mostly known for their flashy, trendy, colorful multi-striped uniforms and in the 1980’s became a team to reckon with.  In 2005 they were the first team from Texas to be represented in the Fall Classic, though fell short against the Chicago White Sox.

Houston Colt 45s Opening Day Ticket

The Houston Colt .45s-Astros are 1 of the next 4 Major League Baseball Franchise teams we will be adding to the #1 selling Baseball Classics All-Time Greats set in the Fall of 2013.  The 4 teams will be available as an add-on for those who already purchased the Baseball Classics All-Time Greats.  Stay tuned in our Blog to learn about the next 3 MLB franchises to be added!

In the Fall of 2013 Baseball Classics will welcome the Houston Colt .45s-Astros to the All-Time Greats set.  There are many great and exciting players to choose from; here’s who makes the cut for the top 15 position players and 9 pitchers that will be added and their impact on the franchise.

Pitchers

Houston Astros JR Richard

JR Richard

J. R. Richard – He is arguably the best pitcher to represent this Baseball Classics All-Time Greats team.  J.R. Richards through with smoke and fire racking up strikeouts on par with the best of any pitcher during his time.

All-Star | ERA 3.15 | Wins/Losses 107/71 | Strikeouts 1493

Larry Dierker – His rookie season was on the Houston Colt .45s and played for the franchise through 1976.  Nothing flashy, yet can count on his consistency day in and out.  Low hits, walks, and home runs allowed, dependable throughout most of his long career.

All-Star | ERA 3.31 | Wins/Losses139/123 | WHIP 1.217

Ken Forsch – Outstanding control pitcher, versatile starter or reliever with quality starts or relief appearances.  For being a control pitcher in 1 season he hit almost as many batters as free throwing JR Richards did throughout his career (11/17)!

All-Star | ERA 3.37 | Wins/Losses/Saves 114/113/51 | HR/9 .7

Mike Scott – 1986 Cy Young award winner is another outstanding starting pitcher on the Houston staff.  Scott was tough on the mound, added a 20 game win season in 1989 when he almost notched his 2nd Cy Young trophy.

All-Star/Cy Young | ERA 3.54 | Wins/Losses124/108 | WHIP 1.201

Joe Niekro – A 22 year career, half of it spent as a member of the Astros.  He was the first pitcher to post back-to-back 20 game winning seasons for the Astros in 1979 and 1980.  Added a knuckleball to his arsenal along with a good mix of other pitches.

All-Star | ERA 3.59 | Wins/Losses 221/204 | Faced over 15,000 batters in his career

Billy Wagner – A 16 season career, most of them spent starring with the Astros as their stopper.  Wagner was tough to get a hit off of and averaged more than 1 strikeout per 9 innings.  He’s the all-time saves leader for the franchise.

All-Star | ERA 2.31 | Saves 422 | SO/9 11.9

Dave Smith – Another outstanding closer for the Houston franchise, started only 1 game throughout his stellar career.  Good luck hitting a home run off Smith, one of several areas he was stingy to batters with.  From the 1987 through 1989 seasons he merely allowed 3 long balls.

All-Star | ERA 2.67 | Saves 216 | HR/9 0.4

Turk Farrell – Another staff member from the Colt .45s before moving on with the Astros he was a 3-time All-Star representing the franchise.  He had a 14-year career mostly coming out of the bullpen, except with Houston he was typically a starting pitcher.

All-Star | ERA 3.45 | Wins/Saves 106/83 | WHIP 1.23

Joe Sambito – Very effective bullpen leader, second most saves in Houston history.  Low walk combined with high strikeout ratio made him tough to be successful against.  In 1979 he pitcher 40 2/3 consecutive innings without allowing an earned run.  He featured a fastball and slider.

All-Star | ERA 3.03 | Saves 84 | WHIP 1.203

Catcher

Alan Ashby – Great with the staff, Ashby caught 3 no-hitters and 107 shutouts during his career.  A modest hitter, se was a fixture behind the plate for the majority of his career with Houston.  Houston hasn’t had an all-star representative behind the plate yet.

AVG .245 | FLG .986 | Hits 1010

Brad Ausmus – Three-time Gold Glove winner and five-time season leader for catchers in fielding.  He is one of only a handful of catchers in major league history to get 1,500 hits and steal at least 100 bases.

Gold Glove | AVG .251 | FLG .994 | Hits 1579

First Base

Houston Astros Jeff Bagwell

Jeff Bagwell

Jeff Bagwell – Should be easily headed to the Hall of Fame when he qualifies.  A team leader had a long, steady career in the plate and field with big-time clutch hits and reliable glove.

MVP/ROY/Gold Glove/All-Star | AVG .297 | OPS .948 | HR 449

Bob Watson – Terrific 19 year career, should have made the All-Star team more times than twice.  Watson was credited scoring the 1,000,000th run in major league history on May 4, 1975 at 12:32 in the afternoon at Candlestick Park, San Francisco.

All-Star | AVG .295 | OPS .811 | RBI 989

Second Base

Craig Biggio – Gritty Biggio was fearsome with his style of play and hustle parlayed into a perennial All-Star.  His leadership in the clubhouse and in the lineup carried the team into the playoffs and first ever World Series.  He’s another member of the Astros that should be headed to the Hall of Fame along with Jeff Bagwell when their time comes.

Gold Glove/All-Star | AVG .281 | Hits 3060 | Runs 1844

Bill Doran – Very popular member of the Houston Astros and hard-nosed player that hustled.  He reached base consistently with walks and just good enough batting average.  Doran is a good glove man at second base.

AVG .266 | FLD .983 | OPS .728

Third Base

Ken Caminiti – Very good hitter for the Astros with a tainted career due to admitted steroid usage including throughout his MVP season.  A great talent who eventually lost his career and life to drugs.

MVP/Gold Glove/All-Star | AVG .272 | OPS .794 | HR 239

Doug Rader – Perennial Gold Glover at third base, Radar saved many hits targeted to left field for hits.  Radar was just an average hitter, but a main stay for years manning the hot corner as their starter.  He did have a pretty decent pop in his bat.

Gold Glove | AVG .251 | FLD .956 | HR 155

Shortstop

Craig Reynolds – Reliable Reynolds was the only shortstop selected to the All-Star teams representing the AL and NL in consecutive seasons.  Interesting stat that he had more triples than stolen bases 65/58.

All-Star | AVG .256 | 3B 65 | FLD .966

Dickie Thon – The long time steady shortstop for the Astros had a career on the rise until April 1984 when stung in the face with a fastball from Mike Torrez.  Thon eventually recovered, but couldn’t quite turn the corner to stardom since, yet had a very admirable career.  Ironically was only hit by a pitch 9 times during his 15 year career.

All-Star | AVG .264 | SB 167 | FLD .965

Outfield

Lance Berkman – 6-time All-Star Berkman is currently only second to Bagwell in career batting average and home runs.  He has a high on-base percentage for a player with average speed, a testament to his great eye at the plate.  Had to play outfield since Bagwell held down the fort at first base, he wasn’t known for his fielding, yet later in his career when moved back to first base fielding his position very well.

All-Star | AVG .296 | OPS .953 | HR 360 | RBI 1200

Cesar Cedeno – Superb with both his bat and glove, to date Cedeno is the best a 5-tool player to ever play for the Houston franchise.  Though he never reached the anticipated level of superstardom, Cedeno had an impressive career throughout and could do it all.

Gold Glove | All-Star | AVG .285 | HR 199 | SB 550 | OPS .790

Houston Astros Jimmy Wynn

“Toy Cannon” Jimmy Wynn

Jose Cruz – 2-time all-star, Cruz was quick and an extra base threat at the plate.  He was a gamer, played in 3 different post seasons for the Astros and a beloved member of the organization.  Batted .300 or greater 6 seasons not including his first MLB season when he batted .353 in 17 at bats.

All-Star | AVG .284 | Hits 2251 | 3B 94 | SB 317 | OPS .774

Terry Puhl – Played 14 of his 15 MLB seasons with the Astros.  He’s an outstanding fielder and consistent performer at the plate.  Fit in well with the style of play for the Astros during his tenor, just enough speed, great defense, and reliable hitter.

All-Star | AVG .280 | Hits 1361 | OPS .737

Jimmy Wynn – The “Toy Cannon” nickname states it all; a power-packed hammer at the plate was always a threat to go deep.  This 7-time All-Star, a member of the Colt .45s during his rookie season, logged 11 seasons with the franchise.  Average hitter who had high strikeouts though matched with high walk totals.

All-Star | AVG .250 | HR 291 | OPS .802

Notable Franchise Names That Missed The Cut.

Joe Morgan would have taken a prominent spot, though Morgan’s glory years were with Cincy.  Roger Metzger all field, but too light a hitter to surpass the all around play of Thon and Reynolds.  Glenn Davis, decent career, yet not close to the same league of Bagwell and Watson.  Carlos Lee, actually had better stats and played just as long for the Chicago White Sox.  Bob Knepper was a close call, but just didn’t quite have enough to beat out the pitchers on our list.  Mike Hampton kind of fell apart after leaving the Astros, his career ERA wound up ballooning over 4.00.

Here’s the starting lineup I recommend generally starting for the All-Time Great Houston Colt .45s-Astros:

  1. 2B – Craig Biggio
  2. OF – Jose Cruz
  3. OF – Cesar Cedeno
  4. 1B – Jeff Bagwell
  5. OF – Lance Berkman
  6. 3B – Ken Caminiti
  7. C – Alan Ashby
  8. SS – Dickie Thon
  9. P – J. R. Richard

We look forward to adding them to the Baseball Classics All-Time Greats later this year.  Do you agree with our top 24 selection for the All-Time Houston Colt .45s-Astros?  Who do you think is the best Houston player to ever play, J. R. Richards or one of their great position players like Jeff Bagwell?  What’s your favorite memory of this franchise?  Let us know in the comments below!

Who Are The Greatest MLB Teams of All-Time?

Who Are The Greatest MLB Teams of All-Time?

If you had to guess which teams are the most popular and greatest in Major League Baseball history what would be your guess?  The 1927 New York Yankees likely come to mind, then again the current World Series Champion 2012 San Francisco Giants may as well.  Or what about the Big Red Machine, 1975 Cincinnati Reds?

1975 Cincinnati Reds Team

We have had the great pleasure over the years with a birds eye view over the past 25 plus years, it’s been interesting to see the orders for MLB seasons and teams placed.  The most popular seasons ordered come from present day (2000’s), next are from the 1970’s, and then the 1960’s.  However there are quite a number of orders for MLB seasons and teams from other eras ordered too.  Our #1 best seller all-time is the Baseball Classics All-Time Greats.

We plan to add 4 more Baseball Classics All-Time Greats franchise teams by Thanksgiving this year to our packaged set.  Recently on our Facebook page and through Twitter, we asked for feedback on which teams you would like to see added such as the all-time Houston Colt 45’s-Astros, New York Mets, Texas Rangers, Kansas City Royals, etc.  Share your thoughts below in the comments!

With thousands of Baseball Classics games out there, there must be ten’s of thousands of games played by our customers since 1986.  Some were likely played for fun, perhaps during a camping trip, kitchen table, or at school and forgotten.  Others may have kept track of detailed stats and still have them today.

I always enjoy hearing from our customers and when they share their BC game play and experience, it makes my day as they share their enthusiasm about their experience.  Believe it or not, I have received some heart-warming emails from gents letting me know their fiancée played some BC games with them, so they knew they were marrying the right gal!  And the stories go on…

Introducing Baseball Classics Games Played

Baseball Classics Community, I’ve added a new section to our website called Games Played.  I’m calling out to you to share your game results with us at www.playbaseballclassics.com/games-played.

Submit any game you just played or if you kept track or your past BC game play and would generously enter those results, together we will see which teams are the most dominating and popular of all-time.  Along the way we will capture your special game notes and I’m sure have fascinating stories and results to share!  Running standings will also be posted.  This will help us all to get the word out about the great game we love, Major League Baseball.

By now those of you who know BC well, you know we like to keep it simple and fast, yet detailed and flexible for you.  The Baseball Classics Games Played page has a form with required fields:

  • Your name or initials
  • Visitor and Home teams
  • Winning team
  • Score

Optional fields include winning & losing pitcher, pitcher that recorded a save, special events (no-hitter, hit for the cycle, etc.), and game notes.

Let’s continue to share and grow the Baseball Classics experience. We have an opportunity to share America’s National Past Time with a larger baseball fan base through Baseball Classics next generation game play and learn which MLB teams are the greatest and most popular moving forward!  I wish I would have thought to begin collecting your game play information a long time ago, though no time like now to start collecting this fun and educational information.

Think of the teams everyone will learn about and why they perform so well or those that fall short.  Beginning April 1st, 2013 Baseball Classics will post all the results submitted and generate a Standings for the most popular so you can see where they rank!

Thank you for your great support and being a Baseball Classics customer.  We always love to hear from you, please provide any feedback and suggestions for this new idea in the Comments section below.

How to Play Baseball Classics: Advanced Level – Play Action Simulator

How to Play Baseball Classics: Advanced Level – Play Action Simulator

With threatening skies to rain out the rest of the game in the bottom of the 6th with the tying run on 2nd base, two outs, and your best pitcher coming up should you pinch hit?  Should you make a defensive replacement at Catcher who is your best hitter, but not so good behind the plate to prevent a passed ball from your flaming throwing stopper coming in with the tying run on 3rd base in the bottom of the 9th and 1 out?

baseball game threatnening skiesThese are many other decisions are all in play when using the Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator.  The purpose is to challenge your management skills requiring important decisions; especially at critical times during your game play.  It’s simulator actions require your reaction or ignite your proactive decision making throughout a game from the first at bat to the last.

Virtually anything can happen when using the Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator.  It is designed to seamlessly flow along with your game play as well as feels like you’re playing against another big league Manager countering your every move.  Thus serves a dual purpose as adding virtually anything that can happen in a Major League Baseball Game while acting as the opposing Manager to the team at bat.

It’s easy to use, let’s take a look.

Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator

How to play using the Play Action Simulator Chart

Before any at bat, the team at bat will announce their play (i.e. steal, bunt, batter  swings away, etc.).

1.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice.

2.  Refer to applicable column on the Play Action Simulator Chart.

3.  If the outcome is “Batter swings away”, roll all dice and refer to the batter or pitcher’s card for the respective play result OR if the outcome is any other play, follow the instruction of that play, then repeat these steps until the result is Batter swings away”

Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator columns

The first column is for the dice roll of the six-sided dice and the next 5 columns depend upon whether there are no runners on base or have at least one base runner.

When there is 1 base runner, reference his Steal rating to cross-reference with the dice roll to determine the play from the Play Action Simulator.  When there are 2 or more runners on base, then reference the Steal rating of the base runner that the team on defense wants to hold closest to the base.

The body of the Play Action Simulator contains virtually anything that can happen in a Major League Baseball game as listed and defined in it’s Legend.  Here are how each play action works in Baseball Classics.

Baseball Classics Play Action Simulator Chart Definitions

Argument with the Umpire

After getting this outcome, roll the dice against the batter and pitcher cards to see what the result is.  If the result is one of the following, the argument with the umpire is with the player as follows:

Walk – Pitcher

All other results – Batter

Heated arguments with the umpire lead to an ejection when it’s the second time in the game that same player had an argument.

Balk

All runners advance 1 base.

Batter Hit by Pitch

Batter is awarded first base, the ball is dead.  Only runners in a force situation at first base, first and second base, or with the bases loaded will advance 1 base.  If a batter is hit right after a homerun, then both benches are warned and the next pitcher to hit a batter by pitch is ejected.  Or if a batter is hit by pitch and the following inning a batter from the other team is hit by pitch, both benches are warned and the next pitcher to hit a batter by pitch is ejected.

Batter Swings Away

When the result is Batter Swings Away, roll all 3 dice again and check the result against the batter or pitcher player card.

Catcher’s Interference

The batter is awarded first base and the play is over.  The only runners that may advance on the play 1 base, are those in a force situation at first base, first and second base, or with the bases loaded.

Dropped Third Strike

When the outcome is Dropped Third Strike, roll all 3 dice against the batter and pitcher cards.  If the result is “Strikeout” then the batter reaches first base safely and all runners advance 1 base.  However if the result was anything other than “Strikeout”, there is no dropped third strike and you will follow the Result from your roll against the batter or pitcher card.

Passed Ball

All runner(s) advance 1 base unless the catcher has a fielding rating of ▲.  If the catcher has that rating then there is no passed ball, instead the result is Batter swings away.

Pick Off Attempt

The pitcher is making an attempt to pick off the lead base runner.  Roll the 3 colored dice; if the result is a 0-0-0, 1-1-1, 2-2-2, 3-3-3, 4-4-4, 5-5-5, or 6-6-6 the runner is picked off.  After a pick off attempt, if using Team Fielding, roll the dice after and check the Error Chart to see if the play was fielded cleanly or an error was made.

Pitch Out

If a steal attempt or suicide squeeze has been called, the base runner attempting to advance must try stealing the base with a reduced rating by 1 triangle.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice and refer to the Steal Chart.  Note, if the runner has a ▼ Steal rating, he is automatically out.

Player Injury

Here’s how to determine which player sustained an injury.  After getting this outcome, roll the dice against the batter and pitcher cards to see what the result is.  When the result is one of the following, the injury is against the player as follows:

Strikeout – Pitcher

Walk – Pitcher

Lineout – Pitcher

All other results – Batter

Roll the 3 six-sided dice and refer to the Player Injury Chart in the Baseball Classics© Baseball Game Chart to determine the extent of the injury.

Note – If you choose to play without injuries, substitute an Injury result with Batter swings away instead.

Rain Delay

When playing in an outdoor stadium, roll all 3 dice before the game.  If a 1-16 is rolled then dark skies and threatening weather conditions exist.  The third time a rain delay occurs in a game, it’s rained out.

If a 1-16 was not rolled prior to the start of the game, then anytime RD is the outcome, instead it is Batter swings away.

Wild Pitch

All runner(s) advance 1 base.

 

Let’s walk through some play examples using the Play Action Simulator using these 3 player cards:  at the plate is 1975 Cincinnati Reds Pete Rose, he’s facing 1962 San Francisco Giants Juan Marichal pitching, and on deck is Cincinnati Reds Joe Morgan.

Baseball Classics Juan Marichal Pete Rose Joe Morgan

Play Example 1 – No runners on base, Single for Pete Rose

Top of the inning, no runners on base.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 9 (3, 3, 3).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 9 and cross-reference over to the next column (No runners on base) and see the result is “Batter swings away”.

Now roll all 4 dice (white binary and 3 six-sided dice), the roll is 1, 8 (2, 3, 3) a Single on Pete Rose’s card.

 

Play Example 2 – Runner on 1st Base, Wild Pitch

Pete Rose on 1st Base, the Red Sox catcher behind the plate has a yellow defensive rating.

With Pete Rose being the only runner on base, his Steal rating  will now be used in the column of the Play Action Simulator to determine the play with Joe Morgan coming up to the plate.  The team on offense elects to let Morgan swing away, so they roll the dice and check to see what happens in the Play Action Simulator.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 17 (5, 6, 6).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 17 and cross-reference over to the red column  and see the result is “WP” (Wild Pitch – green).  This is a wild pitch UNLESS the Boston Red Sox catcher has a green defensive fielding rating, if so the result would change to “Batter swings away” instead of Wild Pitch.  Since the Red Sox catcher has a yellow defensive fielding rating this is a Wild Pitch.

Since the result wasn’t Batter swings away, once again the team on offense makes their call.  With Rose on 2nd Base the call is again to let Morgan swing away.  Rolling the 3 six-sided dice this time they add up to an 11 (4, 4, 3).  Cross-referencing the 11 and the  column, the result is “Batter swings away”.

Now roll all 4 dice (white binary and 3 six-sided dice), the roll is 1, 12 (5, 2, 5) a Single on Joe Morgan’s card; that puts Rose on 3rd and Morgan on 1st Base.

 

Play Example 3 – Runners on 1st and 3rd Base, Pickoff Attempt and a Pitch Out

Runners on 1st and 3rd Base.

With the next batter up in the Reds lineup, they elect to let him swing away.

The team on defense has a decision to make for the Play Action Simulator, for they can choose either Rose on 3rd Base or Morgan on 1st Base to hold close.  Rose has a Steal rating of  thus he’s no threat to steal home, on the other hand Morgan has a Steal rating of  so he’s a big threat to steal 2nd Base.  Thus the team on defense chooses to make any play on him through the Play Action Simulator, meaning we will cross-reference the  column, not the  column for this next roll against the Play Action Simulator.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 14 (3, 5, 6).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 14 and cross-reference over to the red column  and see the result is “PA” (Pickoff attempt – red).

Here’s the definition of what to do with a Pickoff Attempt:

Pick Off Attempt

The pitcher is making an attempt to pick off the lead base runner.  Roll the 3 colored dice; if the result is a 0-0-0, 1-1-1, 2-2-2, 3-3-3, 4-4-4, 5-5-5, or 6-6-6 the runner is picked off.  After a pick off attempt, if using Team Fielding, roll the dice after and check the Error Chart to see if the play was fielded cleanly or an error was made.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice, the result is 2-1-5.  If using Team Fielding, roll the dice again to check whether or not the pickoff attempt was fielded cleanly.

Since the result wasn’t “Batter swings away” yet, the team on offense needs to declare what their intention is for the at bat again knowing the hold is still on Morgan.  With that hold they decide for Morgan to steal 2nd Base.

Roll the 3 six-sided dice to see the outcome in the Play Action Simulator: 9 (4, 2, 3).  Reference the Play Action Simulator Roll column of 9 and cross-reference over to the   column and see the result is “PO” (Pitch out – red).

Here’s the definition of what to do with a Pitch Out:

Pitch Out

If a steal attempt or suicide squeeze has been called, the base runner attempting to advance must try stealing the base with a reduced rating by 1 triangle.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice and refer to the Steal Chart.  Note, if the runner has a   Steal rating, he is automatically out.

With a steal attempt called, Morgan’s Steal rating is reduced from a  to a   rating.  Roll the 3 six-sided dice, the result is an 8 (4, 1, 3) which is Runner thrown out in the  ► column.  Note the  column shows Morgan would have been safe, so the Pitch Out made a big difference in the outcome in the Play Action Simulator.

That leaves Rose on 3rd Base, the team on offense elects to let the current batter swing away.  Rolling the 3 six-sided dice this time they add up to an 13 (6, 5, 2).  Cross-referencing the 11 and the  column, the result is “Batter swings away”.

We demonstrated the impact of the Play Action Simulator in several game situations reflecting how virtually anything can happen in a Major League Baseball game.  It’s the combination of those plays as well as playing against another manager causing the team at bat to either be proactive or reactive.

This 7th How To Play Baseball Classics article concludes a close-up look at how to play from Basic to Intermediate to Advanced levels to further enhance your game play.  We look forward to any questions or comments you have for us.  Please share your experience playing Baseball Classics using any of the areas covered during our series such as bunting, base stealing, base running, team fielding, the Fielding Grid, and Play Action Simulator.

How to Play Baseball Classics: Advanced Level – Fielding Grid

How to Play Baseball Classics: Advanced Level – Fielding Grid

1954 New York Giants WIllie Mays The CatchOne of the most iconic plays in Major League Baseball history was the incredible over the shoulder basket catch by New York Giants Willie Mays during Game 1 on a deep fly ball blasted off the bat by Vic Wertz of the Cleveland Indians in the 1954 World Series known as “The Catch”.  The ultimate when it comes to representing individual fielding play is in your Baseball Classics tabletop baseball board game play.

When it comes to fielding in Baseball Classics, take your baseball game play to the ground level by incorporating individual fielding.  This article introduces the Baseball Classics Fielding Grid for your game play in the Advanced play level.  The Fielding Grid tracks where the ball was put into fair play all the way to the warning track or foul grounds and which fielder makes the play or commits an error.

In our last article, we explained fielding ratings for each player, that all ratings are based on their actual MLB season performance.  Each player card has up to four different fielding positions.

Recapping our Baseball Classics full color theme, the ratings are color-coded symbols.  There are four rating levels as follows:

 Excellent rating      Very good rating      Fair rating      Poor rating

Players fielding ratings are in the upper right hand side located just to the right of their name.

Baseball Classics Fielding Grid

The Baseball Classics Fielding Grid reveals where the baseball was put into play, who fields the baseball, and the type of Out.

The Fielding Grid is a baseball field layout including foul territory and extends all the way to the warning track.  The entire layout is on a grid with the top row and first column each consisting of the numbers 3 through 18 labeled as dice roll numbers using the standard six-sided dice.  The numbers are not in order from lowest to highest or highest to lowest, rather they are distributed based on mathematical equations adjacent to the grid field layout.

The Fielding Grid is organized into 9 areas, one for each of the 9 fielding positions.  Each area is divided by white lines and contains the number for the fielding position covering that area of play on in the grid.  In baseball, each fielding position is assigned a number as follows:

  • 1 = Pitcher
  • 2 = Catcher
  • 3 = First Base
  • 4 = Second Base
  • 5 = Third Base
  • 6 = Shortstop
  • 7 = Left Field
  • 8 = Center Field
  • 9 = Right Field

The Fielding Grid is lined with “dirt” designated by tan color and “grass” represented by dark green.  The play surface also contains a color-coded with light green, yellow, blue, and red square within each numbered position area.  These indicate an error on the play anytime the color square matches the fielding rating color of the player currently fielding that position area.

Baseball Classics Fielding Grid

Individual Fielding Play

The Fielding Grid is your reference point whenever the batter puts the ball into play as a Result from ether the Batter or Pitcher player card is any type of out (shaded in red) or hit (shaded in green) with the exception of a Home Run.  Note – when the play Result is Strikeout (shaded in blue) or Walk (shaded in yellow), the Fielding Grid is not used.

When the dice roll of the play Result is an Out (highlighted in red, for example a Flyout), from either the batter or pitcher card, instead of using that type of Out listed on the player card, use the type of Out from that will be revealed in the Fielding Grid.

When the dice roll of the play Result is a Hit from the batter or pitcher card, you will always use that Hit instead of any Out from the Fielding Grid.

Determining where the ball is put into play

To see where the ball was put into play, use the first dice roll for the play Result from the batter or pitcher card, then make one additional roll.  The “intersection” of these 2 dice rolls pinpoint where the ball was put into play as well as if the ball was fielded cleanly or an error occurred.

Here’s how it works:

Once you have the play Result from the batter or pitcher card, follow these steps to see where the ball was put into play in the Fielding Grid:

– Roll all 4 dice to get your first intersection point

– White binary die = 0

Start your cross-reference point on the far left column on the grid with the number from the six-sided dice, this is your starting cross-reference point.  Then roll the six-sided dice and refer to the intersection point on the grid from the top row as your ending cross-reference point.

OR

– White binary die = 1

Start your cross-reference point on the top row on the grid with the number from the six-sided dice, this is your starting cross-reference point.  Then roll the six-sided dice and refer to the intersection point on the grid from the far left column as your ending cross-reference point.

When the play Result is an Out

Whenever the Result from a player card is highlighted in red, the ball is put into play as an Out, unless an error occurs. Instead of using the type of out from the Result listed on the player card, the Fielding Grid will reveal the type of out. If the type of out listed on the player card from the Result is a Double Play, Groundout*, or (Flyout) then play as follows:

Double Play – If the intersection from the 2 dice rolls is not in zone 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 and instead is in zone 7, 8, or 9 then with any runner on base, it is an outfield Double Play, lead runner and batter are out.

Groundout* – If ball not hit to zone 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, roll again.

(Flyout) – If ball not hit to zone 7, 8, or 9, roll again.

When the play Result is an Error

When the dice rolls intersection point lands on a light green, yellow, blue, or red square then check the fielding rating for the player at that position on defense.  If it matches the color square, then an error has occurred.  For example if the intersection is a red square in area 5, check the rating of current Third baseman and if his rating is red (q), an error has occurred.  However if not, then the Hit or Out is fielded without an error.

If the play Result from the batter or pitcher card was a Hit and an error has occurred, the batter is awarded that hit plus an error occurs in addition to the play.

When an error has occurred, roll all 3 six-sided dice again and refer to the Error Chart to see what type of base error the team has committed. Note if the play was an “Infield Play” or and “Outfield Play” to see if it’s a 1 base, 2 base, or 3 base error.  When a batter reaches base due to an error, the team on offense may attempt to send any base runners an extra base just like they would if it was a hit.

Let’s walk through some play examples using the Fielding Grid using these 3 player cards:  at the plate is 2012 New York Yankees Derek Jeter, he’s facing 1975 Boston Red Sox Luis Tiant pitching, and in the field at Thirdbase is Rico Petrocelli.

Baseball Classics Player Cards Derek Jeter, Luis Tiant, Rico Petrocelli

Play Example 1 – Groundout Second Baseman, no error on the play

No runners on base.

Roll the white binary die and 3 six-sided dice to see the play Result: 0, 14 (6, 6, 2).  Referencing Luis Tiant’s card, the Result is Groundout.  Using this dice roll, refer to the Fielding Grid far left column, number 14.

Roll all 4 to get the first intersection on the Fielding Grid, roll is: 0, 14 (3, 6, 5)

Now roll the 3 six-sided dice, the roll is 7 (2, 2, 3).  Cross-reference 7 from the top row with 14 from the far left column and the Fielding Grid Result is “GO” (Groundout) to the 2nd Baseman fielded without an error.

Baseball Classics Fielding Grid Example 1

Play Example 2 – Double to centerfield, no error on the play

No runners on base.

Roll the white binary die and 3 six-sided dice to see the play Result: 1, 15 (3, 6, 6).  Referencing Derek Jeter’s card, the Result is Double.

Roll all 4 to get the first intersection on the Fielding Grid, roll is: 1, 15 (6, 4, 5).  Refer to the Fielding Grid top row, number 15.  Since the Result is a Double, that is the play Result that will be used on the Fielding Grid.

Now roll the 3 six-sided dice to get the second cross-reference point, the roll is 8 (3, 2, 3).  Cross-reference 8 from the far left column with 15 from the top row and the Double is fielded without an error.

Baseball Classics Fielding Grid Example 2

Play Example 3  – Error on a Popout play at Thirdbase

No runners on base.

Roll the white binary die and 3 six-sided dice to see the play Result: 1, 3 (1, 1, 1).  Referencing Derek Jeter’s card, the Result is (Flyout).  Using this dice roll, refer to the Fielding Grid top row, number 3.

Now roll the 3 six-sided dice to get the second cross-reference point, the roll is 14 (4, 4, 6).  Cross-reference 14 from the far left column with 3 from the top row and PO (Popout) shaded in yellow is the result.  Since the result is on one of the 4 colors that could result in an error, we need to check Third Baseman Rico Petrocelli’s Thirdbase fielding rating.  His rating is yellow, since it matches the color that was landed on in the grid, the result is an error.

Next roll all 3 six-sided dice and lookup the type of error on the Error chart.

Baseball Classics Fielding Grid Example 3

Play Example 4  – Groundout Double Play without an error

Runners on 1st Base, 1 out.

Roll the white binary die and 3 six-sided dice to see the play Result: 1, 6 (1, 3, 2).  Referencing Derek Jeter’s card, the Result is Double Play.  A double play is now in order.

Now roll the 4 dice again to get the first cross-reference point, the roll is 0, 10 (5, 1, 4), refer to the Fielding Grid far left column, number 10.

Now roll the 3 six-sided dice for the second cross-reference point, the roll is 9 (3, 3, 3).  Cross-reference 9 from the top row with 10 from the far left column and LO (Lineout) is the result.  Since a double play is in order, the batter hits into a lineout to Third Baseman Rico Petrocelli and the lead runner (at 1st Base in this example) is picked off.

Baseball Classics Fielding Grid Example 4

 

In this article on Individual Fielding in the Baseball Classics baseball game Advanced play level, we reviewed individual fielding and to play using the Baseball Classics Fielding Grid.  Two dice rolls are plotted on the grid to determine which of the 9 areas the ball is put into play and if the Result is an Out, the type of out as well is if the play was fielded cleanly or there was an error.  If the intersection is on one of the highlighted squares on the grid, refer to the position player’s fielding rating to determine if the play was fielded cleanly or there was an error on the play.  If the highlighted square on the grid matches that fielder’s rating, there is an error, roll again and refer to the Baseball Classics Error chart for the type of error committed.

The next article, will be our 7th in this series of How To Play Baseball Classics as we continue to focus on the Advanced play level.  It will explore how virtually anything that can happen in a Major League Baseball game can happen in Baseball Classics when using the Play Action Simulator.

Which fielding method do you prefer, team or individual based?  Please share your comments, questions, and feedback.