How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Team Fielding

How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Team Fielding

Some of the greatest players of all-time in Major League Baseball history received their glory due to their ability to field their position with excellence.  Brooks Robinson comes to mind among many that developed an outstanding reputation for his glove more than his bat.  He was a master at his craft.

Baltimore Orioles Brooks Robinson

Some would argue fielding in baseball is as important as hitting, if not more so.  Regardless of your position in that debate, it is safe to say that fielding is crucial in any Major League Baseball game.  It’s just as important when playing Baseball Classics next generation baseball board game as well.  That is why we offer two fielding options to play Baseball Classics; one is with our straight-forward Team Fielding & Error Chart and another is with our Individual Fielding Grid for those who want to see where the ball is put into play and if it was handled with or without an error by that player.

This article will cover fielding using the Team Baseball Classics Fielding & Error Chart and a subsequent post will explore the usage of the Individual Baseball Classics Fielding Grid.

In Baseball Classics baseball game Intermediate play level you determine just how valuable fielding is to you when creating your lineup.  This adds another level strategic thinking to your play.  Each player card has one or more Fielding ratings.  All ratings are based on their actual MLB season performance.

Keeping with the consistent easy to play full color theme, the ratings are color-coded symbols.  There are four rating levels as follows:

 Excellent rating      Very good rating      Fair rating      Poor rating

Players fielding ratings are in the upper right hand side located just to the right of their name.

Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart

The Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart has the same look and feel format of our colorful next generation player cards and uses the same lookup when looking up the results of your play actions.  There are 5 columns including the Roll and one for each red, yellow, blue, and red symbol rating.  To the right of the Fielding & Error charts there is a Legend for each.  Note the colors and symbols used to indicate whether a fielding play has been made with or without an error.

Baseball Classics Team Fielding Chart

Team Fielding Play

The Fielding & Error charts in the Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart is your reference point whenever the ball is put into play.  This includes any of the following fielding plays:

  • Groundout
  • Popout
  • Lineout
  • Flyout
  • Double Play
  • Triple Play
  • Single
  • Double
  • Triple
  • Bunt
  • Steal
  • Base Running

Immediately after any of these play results occur, the team on defense rolls all 3 six-sided dice to determine if that play was fielded cleanly or an error occurred by referencing the Fielding chart based on the team’s collective fielding rating.  If there is no error on the play, then continue with the next play or at bat.  However, if an error has occurred, the team on defense rolls again to determine if the error is a 1-base, 2-base, or 3-base error.

In Team Fielding Play, individual fielding ratings of every position player are very important. Each fielders rating symbol are weighted using the following values:

(1) (2) (3) (4)

Add up the values by position to determine the Team’s Fielding Rating. For example, the position players have the following ratings:

Pitcher

Catcher

First baseman

Second baseman

Third baseman

Shortstop

Leftfield

Centerfield

Rightfield

Based on these ratings this Team’s Fielding Rating is 20. (3+1+2+1+2+4+2+3+2 = 20) A 20 is a Blue rating (see the Fielding Chart Legend in the Baseball Classics Game Play Chart).

After each fielding play roll all 3 six-sided dice and look up the outcome based on the Team’s Fielding rating color in the Fielding Chart. If the dice roll equals the color square in that column, an error has occurred.

If an error has occurred, roll all 3 six-sided dice again and refer to the Error Chart to see what type of base error the team has committed. Note if the play was an “Infield Play” or and “Outfield Play” to see if it’s a 1 base, 2 base, or 3 base error.  When a batter reaches base due to an error, the team on offense may attempt to send any base runners an extra base just like they would if it was a hit.

Remember to re-calculate the team’s fielding rating anytime you make a position player substitution during the game.

Play Example 1 – Flyout, no error on the play

No runners on base, the team on defense has a collective rating of 12 points (Green Team Fielding rating).  The Result is a Flyout.

Roll all 3 six-sided dice to see if the play was fielded without an error, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 14 (6, 6, 2)

Referencing the Fielding chart, under the Roll column to 14, then looking under the Green rating column, a roll of 14 is a white filled square.  The Fielding chart Legend indicates “No error on play”.

 

Play Example 2 – Double Play, no error on the play

Runner on 1st Base, the team on defense has a collective rating of 15 points (Yellow Team Fielding rating).  The Result is a Double Play.

Roll all 3 six-sided dice to see if the play was fielded without an error, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 11 (4, 2, 5)

Referencing the Fielding chart, under the Roll column to 11, then looking under the Yellow rating column, a roll of 11 is a white filled square.  The Fielding chart Legend indicates “No error on play”.  That first out was fielded cleanly and is applied towards the base runner who was heading to 2nd Base.

Next, roll all 3 six-sided dice again to see if the second out in the Double Play was fielded cleanly.  Standard six-sided dice total 16 (5, 6, 5)  A reference of the Fielding chart and lookup based on the Yellow column indicates the second out has been recorded successfully.

 

Play Example 3  – Single plus error on the play

Runner on 2nd Base, the team on defense has a collective rating of 27 points (Red Team Fielding rating).  The Result is a Single, putting runners on 1st and 3rd Base.

Roll all 3 six-sided dice to see if the play was fielded without an error, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 16 (4, 6, 6)

Referencing the Fielding chart, under the Roll column to 16, then looking under the Red rating column, a roll of 16 is a red filled square.  The Fielding chart Legend indicates “Error for fielding rating 25 points & up, else no error on play”.

Next, roll all 3 six-sided dice again to see what type of error occurred when the team on defense fielded the Single.  Standard six-sided dice total 7 (1, 3, 3), a reference of the Error chart and lookup based on the Red column indicates “1 Base Error” has occurred on the play, thus moving both base runners 1 extra base.  The runner on 3rd Base scores and the runner on 1st Base advances to 2nd Base.

 

In this article on Team Fielding in the Baseball Classics baseball game Intermediate play level, we covered how important it is to consider the impact of fielding when building your lineup through the easy color-coded, symbolic rating system.  After adding up the total of the team’s defensive point rating, that rating is used to determine if a infield or outfield play was fielded cleanly by referencing the Baseball Classics Fielding and Error charts.  It’s remarkable how one player in your lineup can make or break the defense rating to the next level up or down.  Team Fielding adds a very exciting element to every play all the way to the last out.  It’s easy and fast to use in Baseball Classics.  However if you want to get down to the individual player level, stay tuned for our next article.

The next article, will be our 6th in this series of How To Play Baseball Classics as we focus on the Advanced play level.  I will delve into the 2nd fielding option we offer in Baseball Classics; individual fielding through the use of the Baseball Classics color-coded Fielding Grid.

We always appreciate hearing from our readers, please share your questions, comments, and thoughts on playing Baseball Classics with fielding.

How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Base Running

How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Base Running

One of the most dramatic parts to any baseball game is when runners are flying around trying to safely advance to the next base.  Sometimes even better yet is when a runner is lumbering, huffing and puffing on the base path trying to get to that next base without getting thrown out.

 Chicago White Sox Richie Allen Base Running

One of my favorite greats to watch run the bases wasn’t the fastest, but was one of the smartest.  Dick Allen had a marvelous Major League Baseball career.  From 1972 through the 1974 season he played for the Chicago White Sox and schooled all fans and teams he played against on how to run the bases.

Baseball Classics baseball game Intermediate play level empowers you to make those base running decisions.  Each player card has a Running rating based on their actual MLB season performance.

Keeping with the consistent easy to play full color theme, the ratings are color-coded symbols.  There are four rating levels as follows:

 Excellent rating      Very good rating      Fair rating      Poor rating

The Baseball Classics base running rating for each player card is located on the upper left hand side, just below the name of the player and team.

Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart

The Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart has the same look and feel format of our colorful next generation player cards and uses the same lookup when looking up the results of your play actions.  There are 5 columns including the Roll and one for each red, yellow, blue, and red symbol rating.

Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart

 To the right of the Bunting, Base Stealing, and Base Running charts there is a Legend for each.  Note the colors and symbols used to indicate whether a bunt, steal attempt, or advancing the base runner has been successful or not.

Base Running

The Base Running chart in the Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart is your reference point whenever the team at bat attempts to send a base runner an extra base.

Whenever there is a runner on base and the batter reaches base through a hit or error, the team on offense can make the decision to send any base runner(s) 1 extra base.

When the team on offense elects to try to send a base an extra base, they roll all 3 six-sided dice after the hit or error and lookup the result in the Base Running chart by looking under the Roll column and looking across to the player Running rating.

There are many strategies to consider whether to attempt to advancing base runners for the team on offense and team playing defense in the field.  This includes not only whether to send any base runner(s), but also to make an attempt to throw them out or not.  The following play examples will demonstrate how to attempt advancing base runners in several game situations.

Baseball Classics All-Time Greats Baby Doll Jacobson player cardLet’s use one of the All-Time Greats player cards for these examples; St. Louis-Baltimore Browns-Orioles Baby Doll Jacobson.  This great throw back played 11 MLB seasons.  When he wasn’t roaming Centerfield, he was a danger at the plate with his career .311 batting average and on the base paths, he has a yellow Steal rating.

Play Example 1 – Going from 1st to 3rd Base successfully

1 out, Baby Doll Jacobson on 1st Base, the next batter steps up and hits a Single.  That moves Baby Doll Jacobson to 2nd Base, but the team on offense wants to send him to 3rd base on the same play.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 11 (3, 5, 3)

Looking under the Roll column to 11 then looking under the Yellow rating column, a roll of 11 is a green filled square.  The Legend indicates “Runner safe”.  Baby Doll Advances safely and is now on 3rd Base.

Though what about the batter who hit the Single?  Can he attempt to advance to 2nd Base since the team on defense tried to throw out Baby Doll Jacobson?  The answer is yes!  Thus both teams have decisions to make when a base runner is attempting to advance.  Here’s how this exciting play works as demonstrated in our next play example.

 

Play Example 2 – Whether or not to throw out a base runner trying to advance

New scenario with 1 out, Baby Doll Jacobson on 1st Base, the next batter steps up and rips a Single.  That automatically advances Baby Doll Jacobson from 1st to 2nd Base and the batter reaches 1st.

The team on offense is sending Baby Doll Jacobson to 3rd Base.  Next the team on defense has a decision to make regarding if they should try to throw him out.  Why wouldn’t they?

In Baseball Classics baseball game, when a base runner attempts to advance to the next base on a play and the team on defense tries to throw them out, the team on offense can then send any base runner(s) on the prior bases as Green Run ratings no matter what their actual Run rating is.

In this example, if the team on defense decides to throw out Baby Doll Jacobson who is trying to advance from 2nd to 3rd Base, the team on offense has the option to then send the runner on 1st Base (batter who hit the Single) to 2nd Base using a Green Run rating.

If the team on defense decides not to throw out Baby Doll Jacobson at 3rd Base, he reaches it without a play (no dice roll necessary and reference of the Base Running Chart) and the runner on 1st Base cannot attempt to advance to 2nd Base.  Thus this would keep the double play in order with runners on 1st and 3rd with 1 out.

In this example, the team on defense elects to let Baby Doll Jacobson advance from 2nd to 3rd Base without a throw, thus keeping the double play in order with runners now on 1st and 3rd Base.

 

Play Example 3 – Sending 2 runners on the same play, one safe, the other thrown out

2 outs, Baby Doll Jacobson on 2nd Base, another runner on 1st Base.  The next batter steps up and lines a Single.  That moves Baby Doll Jacobson to 3rd Base, but the team on offense wants to send him Home on the same play.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 4 (1, 2, 1)

Looking under the Roll column to 4 then looking under the Yellow rating column, a roll of 4 is a green filled square with a black dot.  The Legend indicates “If 2 outs runner safe, else thrown out”.  Baby Doll scores and since the team on defense tried to throw him out, the team on offense wants to attempt to send the runner on 2nd Base to 3rd Base (even though you should never make the 3rd out of an inning at 3rd Base!) using the Green Run rating.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 7 (3, 2, 2)

Looking under the Roll column to 7 then looking under the Green rating column, a roll of 7 is a red filled square.  The Legend indicates “Runner thrown out”.  Baby Doll Jacobson’s run counts because he scored before the 3rd out was recorded.

 

Play Example 4 – Scoring from 1st Base on a Single

In Baseball Classics baseball game, it is possible for a runner to score from 1st Base on a Single.  In order for a runner to attempt this remarkable baseball rarity, his player card must have both Green () Steal and Run ratings.

Here’s how it works, when the batter comes up for his turn at bat, with a base runner on 1st Base that has Green Steal and Run ratings.  The team on offense calls for a Hit & Run play.

Hit & Run is a high risk/high reward play called by the offense that sends any base runner(s) in motion with the pitch or in the case of Baseball Classics, with the dice roll to see what the at bat Results outcome will be.

With a Hit & Run play on, roll the dice and let’s say the result is a Single for the batter.  The runner on first automatically moves from 1st to 3rd Base without a throw.  If the team on offense wants to send him home, they can do so by rolling the 3 six-sided dice again and refer to the Base Running Chart, Red column for the outcome (even though the runner has a Green rating) of this exciting play.

 

In this Baseball Classics How To Play article we covered about base running options and strategies both the team on offense and the team on defense will be faced with.  There were several base running play examples including the opportunity to keep a double play in order and what it takes to score from 1st Base on a Single.  Do you have any questions about using base running?  If so, please put them in the Comment section below, also share which base runner you always enjoyed watching because they made great decisions when running the bases.

In the next article of this series regarding How To Play Baseball Classics baseball game, I we will see how to use fielding in Baseball Classics Baseball Game, Intermediate play level.

How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Base Stealing

How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Base Stealing

Of all the plays in a Major League Baseball game, one of the most second-guessed is whether or not a player should have tried to take that extra base or not.  Close plays, especially at home plate are as thrilling as it gets.  Though what about those times when the runner is “out by a mile”?

Should the manager risk it and attempt to send the runner or play it conservative and sit tight?

Lou Brock

In Baseball Classics baseball game Intermediate play level you can make those base running decisions managing from the top step of the dugout.  Each player card has a Steal rating and a Run rating.  All ratings are based on their actual MLB season performance.

Keeping with the consistent easy to play full color theme, the ratings are color-coded symbols.  There are four rating levels as follows:

 Excellent rating      Very good rating      Fair rating      Poor rating

Each batter’s steal and base running rating are on the upper left hand side located just below the name of the player and team.

Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart

The Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart has the same look and feel format of our colorful next generation player cards and uses the same lookup when looking up the results of your play actions.  There are 5 columns including the Roll and one for each red, yellow, blue, and red symbol rating.

Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart

To the right of the Bunting, Base Stealing, and Base Running charts there is a Legend for each.  Note the colors and symbols used to indicate whether a bunt, steal attempt, or advancing the base runner has been successful or not.

Base Stealing

The Base Stealing chart in the Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart is your reference point whenever the team at bat attempts to steal 2nd, 3rd, or Home. However runners with a Steal rating of red () are not allowed to attempt to steal any base because they had 0 successful stolen bases that season which is why that column is blank in the table.

When the team on offense elects to attempt to steal a base, they roll all 3 six-sided dice anytime within the inning before or after an at bat and lookup the result in the Base Stealing chart by looking under the Roll column and looking across to the player Steal rating.

There are many strategies to consider whether to attempt to steal a base.  The following play examples will demonstrate how to attempt base stealing in several game situations.

Lou BrockLet’s use one of the All-Time Greats player cards for these examples; St. Louis Cardinals Lou Brock.  As one of the most feared and greatest base stealers in the history of Major League Baseball, it’s not surprise he has a green Steal rating.

Play Example 1 – Attempted steal of 2nd Base is successful

1 out, Lou Brock on 1st Base, a steal attempt is called by the team at bat.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 14 (6, 6, 2)

Looking under the Roll column to 14 then looking under the Green rating column, a roll of 14 is a green filled square.  The Legend indicates “Steals 2nd base, otherwise thrown out”.  So a close call, though Lou Brock is safe stealing 2nd base.

 

Play Example 2 – Attempted steal of 3rd Base is successful

1 out, Lou Brock on 2nd Base, a steal attempt is called by the team at bat.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 8 (1, 5, 2)

Looking under the Roll column to 8 then looking under the Green rating column, a roll of 8 is a green filled square with a check mark.  The Legend indicates “Steals any base”.  This time Lou Brock makes it rather easily, this is safe stealing 2nd base.

 

Play Example 3 – Attempted double steal of 2nd Base and Home is not successful

1 out and a walk to the next batter runners are on 1st and 3rd Base.  The runner on 1st Base has a Steal rating of Blue, Lou Brock is on 3rd Base with his Green steal rating.  A double-steal attempt is called by the team at bat.

When a double-steal is called, the team in the field determines which of the base runners they want to attempt to throw out.  In this example the team in the field elects to throw out Lou Brock attempting to steal Home.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 10 (4, 3, 3)

Looking under the Roll column to 10 then looking under the Green rating column, a roll of 10 is a green filled square with a black dot.  The Legend indicates “Steals 2nd or 3rd base, otherwise thrown out”.  This time Lou Brock is out attempting to steal Home for the second out of the inning and the base runner on 1st steals 2nd Base without a play on him.

 

When it comes to attempting stealing a base in Baseball Classics, we discussed the Steal rating and how to reference it using the Baseball Classics Baseball Game Play Chart.  We reviewed several base stealing play examples including where not only the team on offense is involved in the strategy, but the team on defense too when a double-steal is called.  Who are some of your favorite base stealers in baseball history and would you rather have a team built on speed for base stealing or on power to manage?

In the next article of this series regarding How To Play Baseball Classics baseball game, I we will explore the exciting element of base running in Baseball Classics Baseball Game.

How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Bunting

How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Bunting

Though bunting seems to becoming a lost art, let’s rediscover this fine hidden gem and how to use it when playing Baseball Classics baseball game.

The second of three playing levels available in Baseball Classics is the Intermediate play level.  This level includes everything in the Beginning play level (see Blog post How to Play Baseball Classics: Beginning Level) and adds more baseball fundamentals to enjoy to your play, tapping into more strategic moves including bunting, base stealing, base running, and fielding.

All batter player cards contain individual ratings for bunting, base stealing, base running, and fielding while pitcher cards also contain individual fielding ratings.  All ratings are based on their actual MLB season performance.

Keeping with the consistent easy to play in full color theme, the ratings are color-coded symbols.  There are four rating levels as follows:

 Excellent rating      Very good rating      Fair rating      Poor rating

Each batter’s bunt, steal, and base running rating are grouped to the left just below the name of the player and team.  There are up to four different positions listed for each batter card and one per pitcher card for how they field their position.

In this article I will cover how to play using bunting in Baseball Classics baseball game and provide several play examples.

Bunting

The team on offense can call a bunt anytime prior to rolling the dice for the current player’s at bat and there are less than 2 outs.  There are 3 types of bunts available in Baseball Classics depending upon the game situation.  Let’s review them.

Sacrifice Bunt – The batter is attempting to move any base runner(s) up 1 base in exchange for being thrown out at 1st Base.

Suicide Squeeze Bunt – The batter must be attempting to move a base runner on 3rd Base to Home safely in exchange for being thrown out at 1st Base.

Safety Squeeze Bunt – The batter must be attempting to move a base runner on 3rd Base to Home safely in exchange for being thrown out at 1st Base.  There are 2 differences between this type of bunt and a suicide squeeze bunt.

1)    if a batter strikes out, the base runner on 3rd holds and is not forced to steal home.  See play example 4 below.

2)    a safety squeeze is successful only when the result is a green box with a check mark; a result of a green box with a black dot in the center is considered a foul ball.

The Baseball Classics Play Chart contains a Bunting Chart and Legend.  After either a sacrifice or suicide squeeze bunt is called, roll the 3 six-sided color dice and refer to the Bunting chart for the result based on the sum of the dice total for that batter’s Bunt rating on his card.  The Legend states the meaning of each color-coded square in the Bunting chart.

75 MorganLet’s use the following 1975 Joe Morgan Cincinnati Reds player card for the following play examples.  He has a yellow bunt rating.

Play Example 1 – Attempted sacrifice bunt result is a successful

1 out, base runner on 1st Base, a sacrifice bunt is called by the team at bat.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 7 (2, 3, 2)

Looking under the Yellow rating column, a roll of 13 is a red filled square with a DP.  The Legend indicates this is a “Sacrifice bunt, otherwise foul ball”.  Since a sacrifice bunt was called, it is a successful sacrifice bunt.  However if a Suicide Squeeze bunt was called, it would have been a foul ball.

 

Play Example 2 – Attempted sacrifice bunt result is not successful

1 out, base runner on 2nd Base, a sacrifice bunt is called by the team at bat.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 11 (4, 4, 3)

The result is a GO when cross-referenced in the Yellow rating column.  The Legend indicates a GO as a Groundout.  The team in the field applies one the options available listed in the Baseball Classics Groundout Result Table located in the Field Manager’s Rulebook.

 

Play Example 3 – Bunt result is a double play on an attempted suicide squeeze

1 out, base runner on 3rd Base, a suicide squeeze bunt is called by the team at bat.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 13 (6, 3, 4)

The result is a DP when cross-referenced in the Yellow rating column.  The Legend indicates a DP as a Double Play.  In the case of bunting with a DP, it is a popout so the batter is automatically out and the runner coming Home is out as well, doubled off from 3rd Base.  The same result holds true when attempting a sacrifice bunt and DP is the result, both the lead base runner and batter are out with less than 2 outs.

 

Play Example 4 – Sacrifice bunt result is a strikeout

1 out, base runner on 2nd Base, a sacrifice bunt is called by the team at bat.

With a roll of all 3 six-sided dice, we have the following:

Standard six-sided dice total 8 (2, 4, 2)

The result under the Yellow bunt rating is a Suicide squeeze bunt, otherwise foul ball.  Since a sacrifice bunt was called, it is a foul ball, thus strike 1 on the batter.  The team at bat may elect to take the bunt off and swing away, however let’s proceed with another sacrifice bunt attempt in this at bat.  A roll of (6,1,1) is another 8 which means this is strike 2 on the batter.  Again, the team at bat may elect to swing away, but should they choose to continue attempt to sacrifice again they may, a very risky move, though could pay off.  A third dice roll of (2, 5, 1) is another 8.  In this case the risky move does not pay off.  This would be a strikeout, as the result is another foul ball.  Since MLB rules apply, a batter attempting any type of bunt with 2 strikes and fouling the ball is out via a strikeout.  In this example the batter is out and the base runner on 3rd Base must attempt to steal the base.

 

Next let’s look at how base stealing is played in the next Blog post article titled “How to Play Baseball Classics: Intermediate Level – Base Stealing and Running”.  When you manage your team, do like to bunt and when or do you feel bunting has gone by the way side in today’s modern Major League Baseball play?  Share your thoughts in the Comments section below.

How to Play Baseball Classics: Basic Level

How to Play Baseball Classics: Basic Level

Baseball Classics is a tabletop baseball board game played with dice featuring the realism of Major League Baseball with full color individual player cards generating accurate results based on each player’s actual season performance.  There are 3 playing levels; Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced thus any baseball fans from ages 8 to adult can enjoy.  All standard Major League Baseball rules apply to Baseball Classics game play at all levels.

Baseball Classics Scorefield

Basic Play level follows standard baseball rules and includes only the most basic plays such as double plays and sacrifice flyouts. Little League players are familiar with these concepts.

Intermediate Play level adapts Basic play level and includes bunting, base stealing, and base running. Casual baseball fans will enjoy these aspects of the game.

Advanced Play level adapts Basic and Intermediate play levels and includes fielding, hit & run, as well as virtually anything that can happen in a Major League Baseball Game.  Plays such as pitch outs, wild pitches, rain delays or rain outs, arguing with the umpire, injuries, and more are incorporated in this level. Expert baseball fans will appreciate the attention to detail in this level.

Use the same player cards for all levels—no need to purchase different player cards for each play level. From youth baseball to expert baseball fan, Baseball Classics gives you everything you need for realistic MLB game action.

This article will highlight how to play using the Basic level and provide game play examples providing a jumpstart.

The Basic level is the fastest way to play Baseball Classics baseball game. The player performance results are just as accurate in this level of play as they are in Intermediate or Advanced play levels.  There are no charts involved, simply use the player cards and dice to play.

Baseball Classics Dice

There 3 are standard six-sided same colored dice and one white binary die with either a 0 or 1.  These 4 dice are used to play for all levels of Baseball Classics.  A great side benefit for the baseball youth is how beneficial it is for the math skills while adding up the various combinations of the 3 six-sided dice rolls.  See the Blog entry I posted on January 2nd, 2013 on “Baseball Board Games Generate Brain Power” for more on this valuable topic.

A good way to remember that a 0 is for the pitcher card and 1 is for the batter card is a 0 is the shape a baseball ball that a pitcher throws and a 1 is the shape of a baseball bat used by the batter.

Baseball Classics Player Cards

There are two types of Baseball Classics player cards; one for the batters and one for the pitchers.  Each at bat the batter will face the current pitcher.  A graphic image in the upper right hand corner of each player card simply shows if the card is a batter card of a pitcher card.  Another indicator besides the batter or pitcher graphic image is the position or positions for that player are listed just under the image.

There are 3 columns in the center of each card, Roll, Result, and Stats.  The Roll column lists numbers 3 through 18, more on this in the next section.  The Result column lists the possible color-coded outcomes, these have been generated based on each player’s actual MLB playing statistics.  The Batter and Pitcher Stats column is your reference guide for how the play performed that season.

Each Baseball Classics batter cards can list a range of various fundamental outcomes such as Groundout, Flyout, Popout, Lineout, Double Play, (Flyout), Strikeout, Walk, Single, Double, Triple, and Home Run.  The difference between a Flyout and (Flyout) is all base runners hold on a Flyout, and any base runner on 3rd base scores on a (Flyout) with less than 2 outs, also known as a sacrifice flyout.

Baseball Classics pitcher cards offer the same possible outcomes with the exception of (Flyout) and Double Play.  In addition, the pitcher card includes a Groundout* and Triple Play.  A Groundout* indicates any base runners advance 1 base with less than two outs.  A Triple Play indicates that the inning is over if there are at least 2 base runners, or if 1 base runner it is scored as a Double Play.  If no base runners, it is scored as 1 out recorded.

Another indicator of a possible Triple Play on the Pitchers card is when a Result outcome is surrounded by brackets, for example <Groundout>.  When an outcome has brackets the white binary die must be rolled.  If a 0 then the play outcome is the same as Triple Play, otherwise the outcome is as indicated within the brackets.

How To Play

It’s very easy and fast to play Baseball Classics baseball game.  Play solitaire or against an opponent.  Make your lineups and choose the starting pitchers and you’re ready to play.  You can use the Baseball Classics Scorefield to keep track of the outs, innings, score, and base runners.

The current batter in the lineup faces the opposing team’s pitcher.  Roll all 4 dice and if the white binary die is a 0, refer to the pitcher’s card for the Result, otherwise if it is a 1 refer to the batter’s card.  Add up the 3 six-sided dice and lookup the Result next to it for the play outcome.

In the Basic play level any base runner(s) only advance as many bases as the batter.

5 Play Examples

Posey Ellis Beginner Play ExampleOne of the many benefits that Baseball Classics offers that no other baseball board game does is the opportunity to order any MLB teams or seasons since 1901 to the present.  Let’s use the 2012 Buster Posey San Francisco Giants batter card and 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates Dock Ellis pitcher card for some Basic play level examples.

Play Example 1 – Result is a Strikeout

With a roll of all 4 dice, we have the following:

Binary is 0

Standard six-sided dice total 5 (2, 1, 2)

With a binary dice of 0 we go to the pitcher’s card, the play outcome Result next to a Roll of 5 for Dock Ellis is Strikeout. 

 

Play Example 2 – Result is a Groundout

With a roll of all 4 dice, we have the following:

Binary is 1

Standard six-sided dice total 10 (3, 3, 4)

With a binary dice of 1 we go to the batter’s card, the play outcome Result next to a Roll of 10 for Buster Posey is Groundout.

Let’s say there were no base runners and 2 outs.  Buster Posey grounds out and the inning is over.  However if there was a runner on 1st Base with less than 2 outs you could either elect to force out the runner at 2nd Base and Buster Posey reaches on a fielder’s choice or instead throw out Buster Posey at 1st Base and allow the runner that was on 1st Base to safely reach 2nd Base.

The Field Manager’s Rulebook has a detailed section explaining the various Groundout options available to the team in the field with any base runner(s) and less than two outs.

 

Play Example 3 – Result is a Home Run

With a roll of all 4 dice, we have the following:

Binary is 1

Standard six-sided dice total 6 (1, 2, 3)

With a binary dice of 1 we go to the batter’s card, the Result next to a Roll of 6 for Buster Posey is Home Run.

 

Play Example 4 – Result is a Double Play

With a roll of all 4 dice, we have the following:

Binary is 1

Standard six-sided dice total 17 (6, 5, 6)

With a binary dice of 1 we go to the batter’s card, the Result next to a Roll of 17 for Buster Posey is Double Play.

Let’s say there was a runner on 1st Base with no outs, then the Double Play outcome is rolled from Buster Posey’s player card.  Then the runner on 1st base is forced out at 2nd base and Buster Posey is thrown out at 1st base.  Anytime base runners are in a force out situation and there are less than 2 outs, the Double Play is in order.

When any base runner(s) are not in a force out situation, a Double Play is not in order.  Thus the Result changes from Double Play to Groundout.

The Field Manager’s Rulebook has a detailed section explaining the various Double Play options available to the team in the field with any base runner(s) and less than two outs.

Play Example 5 – Result is a Groundout*

With a roll of all 4 dice, we have the following:

Binary is 0

Standard six-sided dice total 14 (2, 6, 6)

With a binary dice of 0 we go to the pitcher’s card, the play outcome Result next to a Roll of 14 for Dock Ellis is Groundout*.

Let’s say there was a runner on 2nd Base with one out.  The batter grounds out, though the base runner on 2nd Base advances to 3rd Base safely.

 

In summary here’s what we covered in this Baseball Classics Blog post:

  • There are 3 play levels: Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced
  • The Baseball Classics player cards are used for any of the levels of play
  • The Basic level uses the basic level of Major League Baseball play
  • Player outcome accuracy is just as high as any other play level in Baseball Classics
  • It is the fastest level to play, almost every outcome is determined with 1 roll of the dice
  • It is the easiest to play level since there are no charts
  • We used 5 Play Examples to showcase the simplicity of using the dice for baseball game flow and how to play using basic to some decision-making options with Double Plays
  • The Field Manager’s Rulebook provides a detailed guide of how to play Baseball Classics baseball game.  It is available as a free download from our Resource section at playbaseballclassics.com/gameresources

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